My 2020 Reading Resolutions

Happy New Year! A new year means it’s time to set some new goals for myself. I’ve done this the past four or five years, and I think it’s really helpful. Reading is a huge part of my life, and while it’s definitely a huge source of entertainment and joy, it’s also a way to expose myself to other experiences and to learn new things. So goals, or resolutions, are a great way to make sure that is a focus for me in the new year. So here are my reading resolutions for 2020:

Read 25% Nonfiction (at Least One Per Month)

This will be my fifth year in a row setting a goal for myself to read more nonfiction, and it’s been one of the best things I’ve ever done. I’ve learned so much doing this the past couple of years. The goal I usually set for myself is to read one nonfiction book a month. Which turned out to be a pretty easy goal. After a few years, I didn’t even have to think about it. Last year, I wanted to see if I could read twenty-five percent nonfiction. Which I hadn’t accomplished previously. But last year, I did it! So I’m making it an official goal for this year. Here’s to learning lots of new things!

Read Fewer Books

Yes, you read that right. This year, I would like to read fewer books than I did last year. Which shouldn’t be too difficult, since I read one-hundred and seventy-two books. That’s insane. It’s kind of my own fault for attempting to complete all of the reading challenges – check out my post all about that. But what I learned is that I wasn’t really appreciating most of the books I read, I was just reading them to finish them rather than to actually enjoy them. That’s something I need to fix. So this year, I’m going to concentrate on slowing down and spending time with good books.

Read At Least Six Classics

Last year, I read thirteen classic novels (this is not including the Shakespeare plays I read at the beginning of the year. So, six seems like a comparatively easy number. But, again, I do want to read fewer books this year. And classics tend to take me longer to read, so I’m giving myself more time. I don’t anticipate this being difficult to accomplish, but things happen, and I don’t want to feel pressure to cram in a bunch of classics at the end of this year.

Make Reading Fun Again

While I absolutely love blogging about books, it comes with some side effects (namely, stress). One thing I need to work on is the insane pressure I put on myself to read all of the books all the time. I’m writing this on January 1st, and I’m already starting to feel anxious about how little I’ve read so far this year. WHICH IS INSANE. I am turning into a crazy book person, and it’s starting to make reading seem more like work and less like fun. You might have already noticed I cut down my book reviews from two to just one a week, which has made a huge difference! I also want to concentrate more on fun reading projects for this blog, like my Reading the Lowest Rated Books on my TBR post. I have some fun ideas, and I want to have the freedom to accomplish them, but without all the stress. And really, just read books that I enjoy without the pressure to read books I’m not loving.


I also set my Goodreads Reading Challenge at 100 books, which is what I’ve done for the past four years. It’s just my standard goal, and it’s not too difficult for me to meet, so it’s not really that stressful. Which is the goal for this year.

I’m very excited about this year. I have a lot of great things planned, both reading-related and outside of books, and I think it’s going to be a great year!

What are your reading resolutions or goals for this year?

13 thoughts

  1. These sound amazing! Even the “read fewer books” one 😀 In 2019 I also tried to finish the books for the sake of finishing them, and would love to slow down a bit and take my time reading and loving each and every one of the books I pick up.
    Here’s to a great 2020! 🙂

  2. I set it to 100 this year; last year I did 40 so that I wouldn’t feel pressured since the year before I didn’t meet my goal. I also want to read more diversely and more nonfiction.

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