10 Nonfiction Books I Can’t Shut Up About

10 nonfiction books I can't shut up about

Have you ever read a book you could not stop talking about? Even when it annoys all of your friends and family? That’s me. The worst culprit: nonfiction books. Because how can you resist sharing cool dinosaur facts?

Since it is Nonfiction November, I thought I’d talk about the ten nonfiction books I can’t stop annoying everyone with talking about. Because you should be able to annoy everyone with books, too. Otherwise, what’s the fun of reading? (Okay, fine, that’s not the only reason reading is fun, but it’s definitely a bonus!)

Get Well Soon: History’s Worst Plagues and the Heroes Who Fought Them by Jennifer Wright. Who would have thought a book about plagues could be so fun? Not me. But it was! The reason this book is so entertaining is just how weird the plague “cures” were. My favorite: the exploding frog cure for the bubonic plague. If you’re into weird history, I’d definitely recommend this one!

Catherine the Great: Portrait of a Woman by Robert K. Massie. I love reading biographies, especially of historical figures I’m not too familiar with. And this is exactly why. Because I am now obsessed with Catherine the Great. She’s such an inspirational figure, and I can’t believe I knew almost nothing about her before I picked this up on a whim. And I talked about it so much I convinced a coworker who rarely reads nonfiction to pick it up. I would honestly want to reread this someday.

Leonardo da Vinci by Walter Isaacson. Another biography I can’t stop talking about is Isaacson’s da Vinci biography. I loved this so much, and I gained so much more appreciation for both da Vinci as a renaissance man as well as his art. It made me want to go back to college so I could take an art history class.

The Moment of Lift: How Empowering Women Changes the World by Melinda Gates. This book gave me an entirely new perspective on what women go through in the world as a whole. The main thing I took away from it was just the small changes everyone could make to help, or even how we could be more aware. Even if we don’t have the resources to help, we can still do something. And the best part: if we improve the lives of women around the world, we improve the lives of everyone. Which I think more people should understand.

Factfulness: Ten Reasons We’re Wrong About the World – and Why Things Are Better Than You Think by Hans Rosling. No surprise I loved this one, since it was recommended by Bill Gates (Rosling knew the Gates). This book honestly made me feel better about the world. Sure, it’s not great. But it’s better than we tend to think it is. I think that’s worth sharing with people.

The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs by Stephen Brusatte. I’ve earned myself a reputation as a bit dinosaur obsessed. And it’s all because of this book. Did you know T-rexes had feathers? Or that there were raptors that could fly? Or that a Chinese tyrannosaur was called guanlong, which means crowned dragon? You can see why I got annoying. But I don’t care, because dinosaurs are cool!

Plight of the Living Dead: What Real-Life Zombies Reveal about Our World–And Ourselves by Matt Simon. I get one of two responses: “that’s so cool” or “that’s kind of gross”. I’m pretty sure the second one is a euphemism for “please shut up about zombifying wasps now”. But seriously, nature is insane. And zombies are real. Even if the zombies are mostly insects and plants.

This is Going to Hurt: Secret Diaries of a Junior Doctor by Adam Kay. I loved this book. It is also the reason I will never ever forget what a degloving is (Google if you dare). I was traumatized, so everyone else needs to be, too. (That’s how it works, right?)

Man-Eater: The Terrifying True Story of Cannibal Killer Katherine Knight by Ryan Green. I’m a pretty big true crime fan. And I can’t believe I had never heard of Katherine Knight before I came across this book on Amazon Prime Reading (so it was free on Kindle, in case anyone doesn’t know what that is). She was the first woman in Australia to be given a life sentence. And if anyone deserves life in prison, it’s Katherine Knight. She’s honestly more terrifying than a lot of serial killers I’ve read about. And great nightmare fuel to share with your friends!

Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind by Yuval Noah Harari. This was another Bill Gates recommendation (the fourth on this list), so we all know I loved it. I really enjoyed learning not only the history of sapiens, but also about the other human species that are now extinct. Which everyone needs to know about, obviously.


I love nonfiction! I love learning new things and being able to share those things with other people.

What’s your favorite nonfiction book? Is there a book you can’t stop talking about? Share them in the comments!

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