Book Review | Practical Applications for Multiverse Theory

You all know that I will read (or at least attempt to read) pretty much anything. I can’t really think of a genre I won’t read, but I do have my favorites. One thing I really love to read are novels that are just completely, utterly bizarre. Mainly because they’re usually entirely different than anything else I’ve ever read. And that’s just what I got from Practical Applications for Multiverse Theory by Nick Scott and Noa Gavin.

27040335Loner Scott and head cheerleader Davey have nothing in common. That is, until they start seeing really bizarre things around school. Scott’s teacher suddenly turns into a demon in the middle of class. Davey sees a janitor morph into a sloth wearing a cowboy costume and then has to fight a hell beast in gym class. Scott almost gets eaten by spiders the size of cars. Strange things are happening. Things are there that shouldn’t be. And Scott and Davey are the only ones who can see them. Which means they’re the only ones who can do anything about it. Armed only with school supplies, they struggle to avoid strangling each other long enough to stop the end of the world.

Something in my brain told me that if I looked up into the mirror, I would again see some piece of nightmare that escaped from Tim Burton’s hair.

This book is really, really weird. It contains dinosaurs and giant spiders and brain burritos and (horny) sloths. It was an amalgamation of a million different alternate universes, most of which sound horrible (except the 30 Rock universe – I want to go to there). But I really enjoyed it! It reminded me a lot of John Dies at the End by David Wong, which I read last year (and loved). I just tend to enjoy books that are a bit bizarre. For some reason, I like not really knowing what’s going on in a book (so long as the writing is good). Practical Applications for Multiverse Theory was that sort of book. And I had a ton of fun reading it!

Rating: ★★★★✩

I’d definitely suggest this for fans of David Wong, because it was very similar in both style and story. And if you’re just looking for a YA book that’s completely different than anything you’ve ever read, this might be a good pick for you.

Trigger warning: I feel I should mention that this book contains two separate uses of the word “rape.” Without giving out any spoilers, I will say it wasn’t used in the context of what most people consider an actual rape or reference to an actual rape (the second instance arguably is, but it’s really weird, so I don’t know how to explain without spoiling anything). However, I personally don’t think the word was used lightly or in jest (and it didn’t refer to something that is definitely not rape), so I didn’t take offense. But I thought I’d put it out there, because I know people are sensitive to it, and I did see one negative review given for this reason. So I just thought I’d warn you all going in.

That said, I did really enjoy this book. I think the ending set up a sequel, so I’m kind of excited to see that! Practical Applications for Multiverse Theory will be available on April 19 (though it looks like Amazon might already be shipping them). You can preorder here if you’re interested.

This book was provided to me by the publisher and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

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4 thoughts on “Book Review | Practical Applications for Multiverse Theory

    1. Hahaha. Isn’t it? The sequel to John Dies at the End is called This Book is Full of Spiders. (The cover is awesome!) And I didn’t really think about it, but I guess this book is a teensy bit like Percy Jackson in the sense that insane things happen and the MC doesn’t really know what’s going on.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. “Scott’s teacher suddenly turns into a demon in the middle of class. Davey sees a janitor morph into a sloth wearing a cowboy costume and then has to fight a hell beast in gym class. Scott almost gets eaten by spiders the size of cars.” That whole part was just like Percy Percy Percy in my head! Teachers who turn into monsters? Fighting a beast in gym class? But maybe it’s really just that, and the rest of the book is not like Percy Jackson at all.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. I guess it is kind of like Percy Jackson. The story is different, but the humor and writing are similar. I think if you liked Percy Jackson, you’d probably like this one (though it is definitely not middle grade).

          Liked by 1 person

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